Monthly Archives: December 2011

New Year’s Eve Suitcase Porn | 12.31.11

A) North Face Vault

B) MacBook Air with Banksy vinyl sticker

C) Nintendo DS

D) Pill cutter

E) Business cards

F) iPhone 4S

G) Chevelle’s Hats Off to the Bull CD (remember those?)

H) Books: Meat is All, How the Days of Love & Diphtheria, Normally Special, So You Know It’s Me

I) Pilot G-2 pens, 0.38 thickness

J) 4gb USB PenDrive

K) Hi-Liter, Sharpie

L) Volvo key

M) Aviators

N) Custom Moleskine notebook

O) iPad 2 inside Moleskine case (with extra Moleskine tablet)

P) Westone earbuds

Q) Swiss Army Knife (always be prepared)

R) Ben Marcus’s The Age of Wire and String

S) The Paris Review #199

T) Concord Saratoga watch

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My 2011 Year in Review | 12.29.11

Excerpted from InDigest Magazine:

…There are so many books I loved this year, this list could end up becoming a novella in length! I mean, I read and loved David Foster Wallace’s “unfinished novel” The Pale King, devoured Sarah McKinstry-Brown’s truly fantastic book of poetry, Cradling Monsoons; I finished Thomas Pynchon’s Gravity’s Rainbow (finally!), expanded my taste for the experimental with Darby Larson’s The Iguana Complex and Johannes Göransson’s Entrance to a colonial pageant in which we all begin to intricate, and sung the praises of both Adam Novy’s The Avian Gospels and Christian TeBordo’s The Awful Possibilities.

 And how could I forget the best memoir of 2011, Lidia Yuknavitch’s The Chronology of Water, Roxane Gay’s truly wonderful Ayiti and Ethel Rohan’s Hard to Say? (It’s simple: I couldn’t!) I sincerely loved so many books I read this year—large and small, dense and opaque, traditional and experimental, major presses and indie presses—so much diversity! Indeed, this list would feel incomplete without Brian Oliu’s So You Know It’s Me and xTx’s Normally Special, and I’d be remiss if I didn’t at least mention how much I really liked Jeffrey Eugenides’s latest novel, The Marriage Plot, and Roberto Bolaño’s found manuscript, The Third Reich

Read more here.

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Xmas and Shit | 12.27.11

(reposted from the Specter Collective)

Didn’t do too bad this Xmas; like mensah, I’m really glad to’ve simply survived it.

Got some books: 1Q84, THE ANGEL ESMERALDA and PULPHEAD: Essays. I actually got a VISA gift card, which I used to buy these books—except for the Steve Jobs biography, my wife bought me that one. And (again) with the exception of the S. Jobs biography, I decided to try something different and purchased the other 3 books as Google eBooks through the Indie Bound program, which means my favorite local bookstore (Bookworm—Omaha) gets a cut, which is also pretty kickass!

Amazon really pissed me off with their pre-Xmas Gestapo/guerrilla selling tactics, so I think I’m done buying books for my Kindle app. I submit that the Google and Indie Bound eReader apps are not quite as robust as the Kindle, Nook or iBooks apps, but they’re more than adequate, plus you also get a really nice little warm & fuzzy feeling knowing you are supporting the little guys. Prices are now comparable too.

I also scored 3 Blu-rays that couldn’t be more different from one another: SUPER 8, NOVA’s THE FABRIC OF THE COSMOS and THE EXPERIMENT. I’ve been really interested to watch these so I’m going to get on it this week!

Stan Manley is not a good driver | 12.23.11

I was having a bit of trouble getting productive earlier today. It’s been one of those days; what can I say? But @alananoel and @mensahdemary challenged me, over Twitter, to just write 750 words in about an hour. I thought it’d be tough given the amount of trouble I’d been having sticking with anything resembling work today, but I’m happy to report that I finished with 796 words and potentially another (start of a) chapter of my novel. All’s well that ends well!

Stan Manley is not a good driver. No one who knows Stan well would contradict this statement. Even Stan’s mother—a woman who believes Stan can basically do no wrong, ever—refuses to ride with Stan unless all other transportation options have been exhausted. Stan’s chief problem, at least where the operation of motor vehicles is concerned, is that he unfailingly tries to do what he thinks his passengers want him to do, which he does in the interest of pursuing the path of least resistance and maximum driving harmony for all passengers. However, someone as highly anxious as Stan tries to be, for lack of a better term, vehicularly utilitarian, he panics, and the situation quickly deteriorates into utter chaos.

Passengers experience abrupt, somewhat violent lane changes precipitated merely by a passenger’s wayward glance, i.e. if he or she turns his/her head too quickly—a sure sign, Stan thinks, that he’s managed to miss his exit. Jerky stop-and-go acceleration and braking ensues signaling Stan’s attempt to gauge his passenger’s desired speed—a circumstance greatly worsened when Stan finds himself operating a car with a manual transmission, whereby a clutch pedal is added to the whole driving dynamic. Friends also joke that traces of Stan’s childhood dyslexia rear its head when he puts on his left blinker for a right-hand turn.

As a consequence, most times when Stan is with a group of friends or coworkers who need transportation, he simply opts for riding along, as a passenger. Stan, however, is, himself, a model passenger, never uttering a word of criticism despite the inordinate amount of shit he personally gets for his own driving abilities (or lack thereof). However, in a city with a public transportation system that leaves as much to be desired as Omaha’s, it’s nearly impossible to get around efficiently without driving “there” yourself, or catching a ride with a friend. Unfortunately, even when Stan is navigating the grid-patterned streets solo, it’s a no less harrowing experience.

Arguably, Stan’s biggest problem with respect to driving is overthinking. Many people are horrible drivers because of overestimating their abilities where multitasking is concerned. This is not applicable to Stan. Stan does not text while driving, nor does he talk on his smartphone. The mere thought of rear-ending another vehicle at forty-some-miles-per-hour because he was looking down to correct the autocorrected version of whatever he might have been trying to type causes Stan symptoms that suggest imminent hyperventilation.

Stan does not have to worry about being distracted by manipulating the dials on his stereo either. He drives in complete silence. There’s always a chance someone will call him while he’s driving and a too-loud stereo would prevent him from hearing his smartphone’s ringer. In the event he does receive a call, Stan immediately pulls over to the side of the road to answer it. Stan is also worried that he’ll be unable to hear the approach of an emergency vehicle over his music and thus, be unable to react in an appropriate and defensive-type way he was taught in high school driver’s ed. classes—classes Stan personally found tremendously helpful and of which he could never understand the nearly universal scorn of his fellow classmates.

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